Question: Which Of The Following Describes The Role Of Osmotic Pressure In Capillaries: Draws Fluid Into Capillaries; Increases From The Arteriole End To The Venous End. Pushes Fluid Out Of Capillaries; Increases From The Arteriole End To The Venous End. Pushes Fluid Out Of Capillaries; Stays Constant From The Arteriole End To The Venous End. Draws Fluid Into …

Question: Which Of The Following Describes The Role Of Osmotic Pressure In Capillaries: Draws Fluid Into Capillaries; Increases From The Arteriole End To The Venous End. Pushes Fluid Out Of Capillaries; Increases From The Arteriole End To The Venous End. Pushes Fluid Out Of Capillaries; Stays Constant From The Arteriole End To The Venous End. Draws Fluid Into …

Which of the following describes the role of osmotic pressure incapillaries:

draws fluid into capillaries; increases from the arteriole endto the venous end.

pushes fluid out of capillaries; increases from the arterioleend to the venous end.

pushes fluid out of capillaries; stays constant from thearteriole end to the venous end.

draws fluid into capillaries; stays constant from the arterioleend to the venous end.

Which of the following describes the balance of fluid that ispushed out vs. drawn back into capillaries:

more fluid is drawn into capillaries than is pushed out

more fluid is pushed out of capillaries than is drawn in

equal amounts of fluid are drawn in and pushed out ofcapillaries

What can pass through the fenestrations infenestrated capillaries? Select ALL thatapply:
(Hint: fenestrated capillaries are found in many endocrineorgans.)

gasses like O2 and CO2

small molecules like glucose

proteins

cells

Imagine the black dots in this image represent a chemical thatis small enough to pass through the fenestrations in thisfenestrated capillary. If the black dots move by diffusion, whichdirection would you expect the dots to move?

ovarall, into the capillary from the surrounding tissue

overall, out of the capillary into the surrounding tissue

into and out of the capillary equally

neither into nor out of the capillary